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CONTENTSComEd's Hourly Pricing Program Program Benefits Comparing Your Rate Options Managing Costs with Hourly Pricing Tools to Help You Save Understanding Your Bill Hourly Pricing Program Guide COMED'S HOURLY PRICING PROGRAM ComEd's Hourly Pricing program is an electricity supply option available for residential customers. This program allows you to pay the hourly, market price for electricity. As a residential customer participating in Hourly Pricing, you will also receive customer support and services to help you manage These services include real-time high price alerts, day-ahead high price alerts, an online bill comparison tool, mobile app, and information to help guide your energy decisions. This guide provides an overview of the Hourly Pricing program, tips on managing costs with hourly pricing, and a detailed explanation of the line items that appear on participants' electricity bills. Hourly Pricing Program Guide PROGRAM BENEFITSHOURLY MARKET PRICESComEd's Hourly Pricing program gives you access to hourly electricity prices that are based on the Residual ComEd Zone PJM wholesale market prices. These prices vary from hour to hour and day to day according to the actual market price of power. Higher prices are most likely to occur on weekday afternoons during the summer. You can manage your costs with real-time pricing by taking advantage of lower priced hours and conserving electricity during hours when prices are higher. ComEd is a member of the PJM regional transmission organization, which operates one of the world's largest competitive wholesale electricity markets and is currently North America's largest CUSTOMER SUPPORTThe Hourly Pricing program gives you personalized information, tools, and services to help you take control of your electricity costs. As a participant, you'll receive: • Information and tips to help you reduce your electricity costs. • Access to electricity price updates online and by phone so you can decide how and when to use electricity. • Real-time day-of alerts and day-ahead price alerts so you'll know when prices will be high. • Online analysis tools, to help you manage your electricity usage. • The ability to connect with Hourly Pricing program specialists by phone, email, or a live chat feature on the program website. • The opportunity to sign up for Load Guard and ComEd's Central AC Cycling, which are optional services that automatically cycle your air conditioner to help manage your summer cooling costs.
HEALTHIER ENVIRONMENTBy controlling and shifting your use of electricity to lower-priced hours, you'll help reduce electricity demand during peak times when the use of older, less efficient generation facilities is often needed. In this way, you'll help reduce the release of emissions that contribute to global warming.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide COMPARING YOUR RATE OPTIONS The main difference between ComEd's Hourly Pricing rate and ComEd's standard fixed-price rate is how you pay for your electricity supply.
STANDARD FIXED-PRICE RATEWith ComEd's standard fixed-price rate, you pay a set price for your electricity supply. This price varies by season, and is adjusted periodically, but it does not change from hour to hour or from day to day. You pay the same price for electricity no matter what time of day or which day you use it.
HOURLY PRICINGWith Hourly Pricing, the price of the electricity varies from hour to hour based on wholesale market prices. Your bill will show the total cost for the electricity used, calculated using these hourly prices and your corresponding hourly usage. ComEd does not mark up or profit from the price of power; you simply pay the market price.
Regardless of your electric supply choice (Hourly Pricing or the fixed- price rate), all residential customers are required to pay the same Delivery Service charges. These charges finance the maintenance of the poles, wires, and services required to deliver electricity to your home, and are shown separately on your electric bill. Some other line items on your Hourly Pricing bill will differ from a standard fixed-price rate bill. See "Understanding Your Bill," starting on page 12, for more information.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide MANAGING COSTS WITH HOURLY PRICING SEASONAL PRICE PATTERNSHourly, market-based electricity prices typically change as the demand for electricity changes; higher demand usually means higher hourly prices. Average prices tend to be higher on weekdays and lower at night and on weekends. The demand and price patterns also vary by season, as described below. By keeping these patterns in mind, you could wisely manage your electricity usage and costs.
SUMMER PRICE PATTERNS Electricity prices typically fluctuate most during the summer. This is because electricity demand also fluctuates considerably as businesses and households turn air conditioners on and off. When temperatures soar, the hourly price can rise significantly. The Hourly Pricing program is about participants making smart choices about how they use energy during these high price periods to manage their household energy budget. Normally, the highest prices in the summer will be in the late afternoon and early evening. Depending on weather and other conditions, some days will have higher overall prices than others.
TYPICAL REAL-TIME PRICING PATTERNS* *Based on average prices for January 2012 through April 2015. Nonsummer months include October through May. Summer months include June through September. Hourly Pricing Program Guide


FALL, WINTER, AND SPRING PRICE PATTERNS Compared with summer prices, average fall, winter, and spring prices are typically lower. This is because overall demand is not driven by air conditioning like it is during the summer months. During the cooler months, there tends to be a small price spike in the morning and another slightly larger spike in the evening. While the highest prices of the day during the cooler months are generally lower than the highest prices during the summer months, high prices can still occur during the winter, particularly during an extreme or extended cold snap.
OTHER FACTORS THAT IMPACT REAL-TIME PRICESThe weather can have a big impact on the wholesale real-time price of electricity, particularly during the summer when air conditioner usage drives up demand for electricity. This is why summer electricity prices tend to be highest during the afternoon. This is also why hot days tend to have higher overall prices than cooler days. During the winter, electricity prices can also increase when there is a sudden and significant temperature drop, or when extended cold snaps push up natural gas prices, increasing the cost of operating gas-burning power plants. Prices can sometimes increase in the spring or fall if a heat wave occurs during a time when some power plants are shut down for maintenance.
There can also be unexpected and brief price spikes if multiple power plants have technical or mechanical problems at the same time, or if there are problems in parts of the regional transmission network that is used to transport electricity from the power plant to ComEd's distribution system. Natural gas and coal prices also impact the market price of electricity, so when the costs of other fuels increase, those changes can be reflected in real-time electricity prices.
A note about negative prices:
With real-time hourly market prices, it is possible for the price of electricity to be negative for short periods of time. This typically occurs in the middle of the night and, under certain circumstances, when electricity supply is far greater than demand. In the market, some types of electricity generators cannot or prefer not to reduce electricity output for short periods of time when demand is insufficient, and, as a result, some generators may provide electricity to the market at prices below zero. Since Hourly Pricing participants pay the market price of electricity, they are actually being paid to use electricity during negative priced hours.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide


TOOLS TO HELP YOU SAVE Being able to manage your energy bill depends on making smart choices about how much energy to use and when to use it. Customers on ComEd's fixed-price rate don't have information about how much electricity costs at different times of the day. Hourly Pricing participants do have this information and it can be used to make some important home energy management decisions. Here are some tools that can help.
COMED'S CENTRAL AC CYCLING AND LOAD GUARDCOMED'S CENTRAL AC CYCLING If you have central air conditioning, you can sign up for ComEd's Central AC Cycling. AC Cycling allows ComEd to cycle your air conditioner compressor off and on during summer days when demand for electricity is highest. Your fan stays on to circulate air, so your home stays comfortable. When you sign up for ComEd's Central AC Cycling, you will receive a credit of $5 or $10 (depending on which cycling option you select) on your June through September ComEd bills. LOAD GUARD AUTOMATIC PRICE RESPONSE SERVICE Once enrolled in ComEd's Central AC Cycling, Hourly Pricing participants can also sign up for the Load Guard Automatic Price Response Service by visiting the Hourly Pricing program's website at ComEd.com/HourlyPricing. Load Guard is an automatic air
conditioner cycling option designed especially for Hourly Pricing participants. It allows you to choose a price level at which you want your air conditioner to cycle. You can choose from two levels: • Cooler for the planet (10 cents). Choosing this setting
activates the two-hour AC conservation period whenever a 10 cent high price alert is issued. You'll use less electricity during times of high demand, which helps reduce the release of emissions that contribute to global warming. • Cooler for your home (14 cents). Choosing this level delays
activation of the two-hour AC conservation period until the price reaches 14 cents or higher. This is a good choice if you prefer a cooler indoor temperature, but still want protection against extreme electricity prices.
To enroll or learn more about ComEd's Central AC Cycling and Load Guard, go to ComEd.com/HourlyPricing or call 888-202-7787.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide


HIGH PRICE ALERTSYou have two ways to get updates about high electricity prices: real- time price alerts and day-ahead price alerts. To learn more or change your alert settings, sign in to your account information page at ComEd.com/HourlyPricing or email us at
REAL-TIME PRICE ALERTS Real-time price alerts will notify you when real-time day-of prices are high during the day. You can decide which price threshold is right for you and choose to receive alerts by email or text message. When the 5-minute price is at or above your selected price for 30 consecutive minutes, an alert will be triggered and you will be notified based on your personal preference. DAY-AHEAD PRICE ALERTS Day-ahead price alerts will notify you after 4:30 p.m. when (day-ahead) prices will be high for any number of hours during the following day. You can choose to receive day-ahead price alerts via automated phone call, email, or text message. You can learn more or change your alert options at ComEd.com/HourlyPricing.
ACCESS TO PRICE INFORMATIONThe Hourly Pricing program uses hourly, market-based electricity prices, also known as real-time prices. These prices vary based on the actual price of electricity in the market. Each evening, day-ahead prices for the following day will be available online and by phone at 888-202-7787.
Day-ahead prices can be used as an indicator of the following day's real- time electricity prices. Typically, the day-ahead prices offer an accurate picture of the price pattern for the following day. You can use these day- ahead prices to help you plan how and when you use energy. You also can go to ComEd.com/HourlyPricing to view hourly
electricity prices throughout the day. MY HOURLY PRICING ACCOUNTEach month after your bill is calculated, you will be able to log in to My Hourly Pricing Account to access a breakdown of your hourly electricity usage and costs. Hourly Pricing Program Guide


You'll also be able to compare your costs with Hourly Pricing to what you would have paid on ComEd's standard fixed-price rate. To access the online tools and update your alert settings, visit CHECKING PRICING ON COMED'S HOURLY PRICING PROGRAM WEBSITE Go to ComEd.com/HourlyPricing to check real-time prices or view past price patterns by the day, week, month, or year. Hourly Pricing participants can access specialized tools through an enhancement to ComEd's mobile app. The app allows you to easily check real-time prices, access your savings information, and quickly connect to Hourly Pricing specialists.
The free ComEd mobile app is available for download on iPhone® and Android™ devices. To download the app, visit ComEd.com/app or search "ComEd" in your smartphone's app store. If you previously downloaded the ComEd app, please download the latest update to access the new features available to Hourly Pricing participants. The tool is only available to Hourly Pricing participants and can be found by opening the app and navigating to the plus sign labeled "more" at the bottom right corner of the screen.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide UNDERSTANDING YOUR BILL Some of the line items and charges will be the same for both participants in ComEd's Hourly Pricing program and for participants on ComEd's fixed- price rate. Some line items will be different, or will be calculated based on different rates. Below, you will find more information about the line items on your bill, and how the charges for Hourly Pricing participants differ from the charges for customers on ComEd's fixed-price rate. All charges on ComEd bills are based on tariffs and riders approved by the Illinois Commerce Commission. ComEd's full rate book is available online and should be considered the official record for these items. pages/current-rates.aspx for details.
EXAMPLE HOURLY PRICING CUSTOMER BILL PAGE 2, CHARGE DETAILS Hourly Pricing Program Guide THE COMPONENTS OF YOUR COMED BILL The core components of all bills are still the same. They include Delivery Service Charges, Electricity Supply Charges, and Taxes and other charges. These components are broken into the following line items on participants' bills. Most line items appear on both Hourly Pricing bills and fixed-price rate bills. Those that appear only on Hourly Pricing bills or are calculated differently for Hourly Pricing participants are indicated below.
A. Electricity Supply Services cover the actual supply of electricity
(either ComEd's fixed-price Rate BES Electricity Supply Charges or the special combined hourly rate of Rate BESH and Rider RRTP Electricity Supply Charges). • Electricity Supply Charge (calculated differently for Hourly Pricing)• Transmission Services Charge (calculated differently for Hourly Pricing)• Capacity Charge (separate Hourly Pricing line item; costs included in Fixed-Price Rate Electricity Supply Charge) • Purchased Electricity Adjustment (calculated differently for Hourly Pricing) • Misc Procurement Component (separate Hourly Pricing line item; costs included in Fixed-Price Rate Electricity Supply Charge) B. Delivery Services – ComEd
• Customer Charge (similar for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing. The only difference is that a participation charge is included for Hourly Pricing.) • Standard Metering Charge (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing) • Distribution Facilities Charge (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing) • IL Electricity Distribution Charge (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing) C. Taxes and Fees
• Environmental Cost Recovery Adjustment (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing) • Energy Efficiency Programs (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing) • Franchise Costs (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing)• Taxes (same for Fixed-Price Rate and Hourly Pricing) Hourly Pricing Program Guide HOW YOUR HOURLY PRICING BILL DIFFERS FROM A FIXED-PRICE RATE BILL Most line items are the same for all residential customers and
most are charged at the same rate:
• All standard delivery service related charges are the same, except the Customer Charge. • Taxes and other charges will use the same rates for both Hourly Pricing and fixed-price rate customers. Some line items and charges on your Hourly Pricing bill will
differ from the standard fixed-price rate:
• The Customer Charge line item includes the Hourly Pricing Program Cost Recovery Charges from Rider RCA. Effective with the July 2012 monthly bills, the charges will be $0.04 per month for all residential retail customers not taking service under Hourly Pricing and $0.43 per month for all residential retail customers taking service under Hourly Pricing. The $0.43 per month includes the $0.04 charge applicable to all residential retail customers, plus a $0.39 participant charge for all residential retail customers taking service under Hourly Pricing. These charges are subject to change as allowed by the Illinois Public Utilities Act. • Under supply related charges, all customers will have an Electricity Supply Charge, a Transmission Services Charge, and a Purchased Electricity Adjustment. However, the rates for these line items are different for Hourly Pricing and fixed-price rate customers. • Hourly Pricing bills include separate line items for the Electricity Supply Charge, the Capacity Charge, and the Miscellaneous Procurement Component Charge. Fixed-Price rate bills include the costs for these three items in a single line item (listed as Electricity Supply Charge).
DIFFERENCES IN HOW CHARGES ARE CALCULATED UNDER HOURLY PRICING VS. COMED'S FIXED-PRICE RATE The Electricity Supply Charge
ComEd's fixed-price rate Electricity Supply Charge is based on the costs of procuring power, which are incurred pursuant to the procurement plan approved by the Illinois Commerce Commission.This Electricity Supply Charge includes the cost for the electricity supply, capacity, and other miscellaneous services and procurement costs. All of these components Hourly Pricing Program Guide are purchased together and combined into one Electricity Supply Charge for fixed-price rate customers. The Hourly Pricing Electricity Supply Charge is based on the ComEd Zone PJM real-time hourly prices, but it does not include capacity costs or miscellaneous services and procurement costs. Therefore, Hourly Pricing participants have a separate Capacity Charge line item and a Miscellaneous Procurement Component Charge line item. Both of these are explained in detail in the section titled "Answers to Your Questions about Specific Line Items." ComEd does not profit from the Electricity Supply Charges, it simply passes through the cost of supplying electricity to its customers.
Transmission Services Charge and
Purchased Electricity Adjustment
The Transmission Services Charge is different for Hourly Pricing
participants than it is for customers on the fixed-price rate because the supply for Hourly Pricing participants is procured differently (directly through PJM rather than through the Illinois procurement processes). For a similar reason, the Hourly Pricing participants' Purchased Electricity Adjustment (PEA) charge or credit is different from the charge or credit for fixed-price rate customers. ComEd does not mark up or profit from these charges. They are simply a pass-through of costs incurred by ComEd. ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT SPECIFIC LINE ITEMS Q. Why do I pay a different Transmission Services Charge with
the Hourly Pricing program?
A. On the fixed-price rate, ComEd purchases transmission services for all fixed-price rate customers in regional markets regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). This charge is then apportioned to different customer groups on the fixed-price rate, resulting in different Transmission Services Charge rates for residential, commercial and On the Hourly Pricing rate, ComEd purchases transmission services for all hourly rate participants in regional markets regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The same Transmission Services Charge rate is charged to all hourly customers (residential, commercial, and industrial). Hourly Pricing Program Guide Q. What is the Purchased Electricity Adjustment?
A. The Purchased Electricity Adjustment (PEA) acts as the balancing mechanism to assure that ComEd's supply charges exactly match supply costs over time. This balance is reviewed monthly and the charge rate is adjusted accordingly. ComEd's revenues track the actual payments that ComEd must make to procure supply service. The Purchased Electricity Adjustment can be a charge or a credit that addresses the difference, if any, between the actual amount of money collected from ComEd's customers for electricity supplied and the cost incurred to supply that electricity. The supply costs are tracked (and the PEA is adjusted) separately for different customer groups. As a result, the Purchased Electricity Adjustments may differ between Hourly Pricing participants and customers on the standard ComEd fixed-price rate. In 2014, there were six months when this charge was either lower or the same for the hourly participants and six months when this charge was either a higher charge or a lower credit for the hourly customers. pdf?FileTracked=true sheets No. 326-328 for more information related
to the PEA Factor.
Q: What is the Capacity Charge?
A. The Capacity Charge covers ComEd's costs to reserve enough electricity to meet demand at all times, including peak hours. Capacity Charges essentially allow ComEd to reserve generating capacity in advance, ensuring that enough electricity will be available when it is needed. All electricity suppliers are required to reserve capacity to cover their customer's Capacity Obligation (for a more detailed description of the Capacity Obligation please see the question that addresses how the Capacity Charge is calculated). The Capacity Obligation represents your expected level of hourly usage in the afternoon on a hot summer day.
For residential customers who pay the standard ComEd fixed-price rate, capacity costs are included in their fixed-price rate per kilowatt hour Electricity Supply Charge. For Hourly Pricing participants, the Electricity Supply Charge does not include these capacity costs. Instead, ComEd lists this charge as a separate line item on Hourly Pricing bills (labeled as the Capacity Charge). As the market price of capacity fluctuates, both standard fixed-price rate customers and Hourly Pricing participants will Hourly Pricing Program Guide see adjustments to their rate. The Capacity Charge item on your bill is adjusted every year in June. ComEd does not profit from the Capacity Charge. Instead, ComEd simply passes through capacity costs to its customers without mark up.
Q: How is the Capacity Charge calculated?
A. There are two components to this charge: the Capacity Obligation and the Capacity Charge rate. Multiplied together, they make up the Capacity Charge item on your bill. The method used to calculate your individual Capacity Charge depends on when your Hourly Pricing meter was first installed.
If you were enrolled in the Hourly Pricing program or had a smart meter during the previous summer, your Capacity Obligation is based on your individual electricity usage data from that summer. In this case, ComEd calculates your highest electricity demand (adjusted for Transmission and Distribution losses) coincident with the five hours of the summer when the overall PJM System demand was highest (PJM Coincident Demand) (this has historically occurred between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays), and the five hours of the summer when ComEd's System demand was highest (ComEd Coincident Demand) (these sets of hours may or may not overlap). These two sets of five coincident demands are averaged and adjusted to determine your contribution to the system load, creating your Capacity Obligation.
Your Capacity Obligation is then used to calculate your individual Capacity Charge. So the higher or lower your demand was during those ten peak hours (coincident with the five PJM System peak hours and the five ComEd System peak hours) of last summer, the higher or lower your Capacity Charge will be this year beginning with your June 2015 billing period.
If you have not yet had a meter capable of measuring and recording electric usage in hourly intervals in place for a full summer, your Capacity Obligation is set by using averages of peak demand for your customer class, adjusted based on your monthly kilowatt hour (kWh) usage compared to your customer class' monthly kWh usage. (ComEd's four residential customer classes are: Single Family Non-Electric Space Heating, Single Family Electric Space Heating, Multi-Family Non- Electric Space Heating, and Multi-Family Electric Space Heating.) Calculation of the Capacity Charge is subject to periodic changes. Please check back frequently for updates.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide Capacity Charge Rate
The Capacity Charge rate is updated annually (it can go up or down) based on the cost of capacity in the PJM wholesale market. For information about the current Capacity Charge Rate, go to ComEd.com or contact an Hourly Pricing program specialist. Q: How can I reduce my Capacity Charge in the future?
A: Reducing your electricity usage during peak hours (this has
historically occurred between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. on the hottest weekdays of the summer) may help to reduce the Electricity Supply Charge portion of your bills this summer, and could reduce the Capacity Charge portion of your future bills. In general, the price of electricity goes up when demand is high, so the peak system load is likely to correspond with higher real-time prices. This means that if you can reduce your electricity use when prices are high, you'll also have a good chance of reducing your demand during peak system load. This in turn may result in a lower Capacity Obligation, and thus, a lower Capacity Charge on your bill in the future. This assumes the capacity rates in PJM do not increase. As noted above, the Capacity Charge rate is updated annually (it can go down or up) based on the cost of capacity in the PJM wholesale market.
Q. What is the Miscellaneous Procurement Component Charge?
A. The Miscellaneous Procurement Component Charge is a line item
for hourly participants only. It is itemized on your bill to make it easier to compare the total supply costs under Hourly Pricing to the fixed- price rate. This charge recovers the costs that ComEd incurs related to procuring electricity supply directly from PJM-administered markets for customers with hourly energy pricing that are not recovered through the application of the Capacity Charge, the Electricity Supply Charge, and the Transmission Charge. Similar costs for customers on the fixed-price rate are included in their Electricity Supply Charge. Q. What is the IL Electricity Distribution Charge?
A. The IL Electricity Distribution Charge is the same for both Hourly
Pricing participants and customers on the standard fixed-price rate. This charge recovers the Illinois Electricity Distribution Tax and uncollectible costs associated with the application of that tax. This is not a new charge. It previously was part of the Distribution Facilities Charge. It no longer will be included in the Distribution Facilities Charge, but will appear as a separate line item in the Delivery Services section of the bill.
Hourly Pricing Program Guide Q. What is the Customer Charge?
A. The Customer Charge is calculated the same way for both Hourly
Pricing participants and customers on the standard fixed-price rate. The only difference is that a participant charge is included for customers taking service under Hourly Pricing. The Customer Charge recovers costs such as the standard service connection, customer service operations, and billing. The Customer Charge also includes charges from Rider RCA for state funds for renewable energy resources, coal technology development, low-income energy assistance, and the Hourly Pricing program cost recovery charge. The charges from Rider RCA for the Hourly Pricing program cost recovery include a $0.39 monthly participant charge for customers taking service under Hourly Pricing. This is in addition to the $0.04 monthly charge that all residential retail customers (including those taking service under Hourly Pricing) are billed. These charges are subject to change as allowed by the Illinois Public Utilities Act. Q. What is the Energy Efficiency Programs charge?
A. The Energy Efficiency Programs charge is a charge that is the same for
all residential customers. This charge recovers costs related to ComEd's energy efficiency and demand response plans, which were approved by the Illinois Commerce Commission. This includes programs that are developed, implemented, or administered by or for ComEd or the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). ComEd does not mark up or profit from these charges.
FOR MORE INFORMATION Learn more about ComEd's Hourly Pricing program: Email: info@ComEdHourlyPricing.com
Hourly Pricing Program Guide Commonwealth Edison Company, 2015

Source: http://studentpower.educationaldividends.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-November-most-recent-HourlyPricing-Guide-2015-2016.pdf

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